Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe.

Posts tagged “1944

A US soldier offers his hand to a woman leaving a cave where she had hidden with her child, Saipan; ca. 1944.

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She isn’t only scared by the war, but also by the Japanese propaganda. The Japanese told everyone that Americans would rape and murder them if captured. According to the PBS Nova documentary, the Japanese government told the citizens that in order to become a United States Marine, you had to murder your parents. American loudspeaker units and American marines offered food and safe passage. But many of the civilians were not interested or were too frightened to listen. Some waded into the sea, some used knives, some borrowed grenades from Japanese soldiers… Most though seem to have used a nearby suicide cliff, where whole families walked off into eternity.

*Here’s footage of the suicides from a documentary (showing a actual suicide and some of the bodies at the bottom of the cliffs):

More Information:

According to Wikipeida, 22,000 or the 25,000 civilian inhabitants of Saipan committed suicide at the request of the emperor:

Emperor Hirohito personally found the threat of defection of Japanese civilians disturbing. Much of the community was of low caste, and there was a risk that live civilians would be surprised by generous U.S. treatment. Native Japanese sympathizers would hand the Americans a powerful propaganda weapon to subvert the “fighting spirit” of Japan in radio broadcasts. At the end of June, Hirohito sent out an imperial order encouraging the civilians of Saipan to commit suicide. The order authorized the commander of Saipan to promise civilians who died there an equal spiritual status in the afterlife with those of soldiers perishing in combat. General Hideki Tōjō intercepted the order on 30 June and delayed its sending, but it went out anyway the next day. By the time the Marines advanced on the north tip of the island, from 8–12 July, most of the damage had been done. 1,000 Japanese civilians committed suicide in the last days of the battle to take the offered privileged place in the afterlife, some jumping from “Suicide Cliff” and “Banzai Cliff”.

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Japanese plane shot down during the battle of Saipan; 1944

What I find most striking in this photo is the plane still appears to be trying to hit a boat off in the distance.

What I find most striking in this photo is the plane still appears to be trying to hit a boat off in the distance.

The aircraft carrier in the distance is the escort carrier USS Kitkun Bay (CVE-71).


American medic helping German soldier; France, 1944.

The Germans threw everyone they could at the war towards the end.

Really reminds you what war generally is: kids fighting and dying for the ideals/wishes/whims of older men, most of whom have never been in a dangerous situation in their lives.

Pretty much by the end of World War II, most people fighting for Germany in Berlin were part of the Hitler Youth and therefore under 18. Lots of stories came back from soldiers that saw teenage girls manning artillery cannons and 12 year old boys firing at Russian soldiers.

It’s really shocking when you realize that these people aren’t always grown men; in fact, lots of the time it’s quite the opposite.

“16 years old when I went to the war,

To fight for a land fit for heroes,

God on my side, and a gun in my hand,

Chasing my days down to zero,

And I marched and I fought and I bled and I died,

And I never did get any older,

But I knew at the time that a year in the line,

Is a long enough life for a soldier.”

– Motorhead – 1916 (Which is a surprisingly sad song!)


American soldiers relax with their mascot, “Axis Sally,” which was “liberated” during the battle for control of the Anzio beachhead; ca. 1944.

The Anzio bridgehead was held for the price Of a few hundred ordinary lives.

The Anzio bridgehead was held for the price Of a few hundred ordinary lives.

 

 


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Soviet Red Army officers standing beside a pile of human ashes in the Majdanek concentration camp, 1944

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Gaston Rébuffat atop the aiguille du Roc, Mont Blanc massif, France; ca.1944

This was photo was chosen to be included on the Golden Record on Voyager 1 and 2.

This was photo was chosen to be included on the Golden Record on Voyager 1 and 2.

Gaston Rébuffat was actually an instructor at a military school of mountaineering run by the 27th mountain infantry. In any case, the French government clearly appreciated his contribution to history because it awarded him the Légion d’honneur in 1984.