Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe.

Posts tagged “WWI

Image

World War I – Trench Rats; ca.1917

N7A3Hxq


Soldiers posing with unexploded German shells exactly 100 years ago; December 16th, 1914

3rd-battalion-hartlepool-1914

The raid on Scarborough, Hartlepool and Whitby, which took place on 16 December 1914, was an attack by the Imperial German Navy on the British seaport towns of Scarborough, Hartlepool, West Hartlepool, and Whitby. The attack resulted in 137 fatalities and 592 casualties, many of whom were civilians. The attack resulted in public outrage towards the German navy for an attack against civilians, and against the Royal Navy for its failure to prevent the raid.


Image

WWI: German “Krupp L/12” howitzer (419mm – 16.5in)

OirLRC2


Image

A French soldier of the 151st Régiment d’Infanterie posing with his dog; ca. 1917.

Mu3ooHT


Australian soldiers blinded in a German gas attack at an aid station near Villers-Bretonneux, France; May 27, 1918.

The differences in their body language is really interesting. You have everything from just totally dejected to a couple guys who might as well just be laying out sunbathing for all the concern they're displaying.

The differences in their body language is really interesting. You have everything from just totally dejected to a couple guys who might as well just be laying out sunbathing for all the concern they’re displaying.

The Germans were using mustard gas at Villers-Bretonneux. A mild dose would result in the eyelids swelling up to the point where the casualty would be temporarily blinded, more severe exposure could damage their eyes to the point where they’d be blind permanently.


Generalfeldmarschall August von Mackensen, officer in the German Army, wearing the Totenkopf (skull and cross bones) which was part of German military gear since the 18th century

Kl56SXI

Anton Ludwig August von Mackensen (6 December 1849 – 8 November 1945), born August Mackensen, was a German soldier and field marshal. He commanded with success during the First World War and became one of the German Empire’s most prominent military leaders. After the Armistice, Mackensen was interned for a year. He retired from the army in 1920 and was made a Prussian state councillor in 1933 by Hermann Göring. During the Nazi era, Mackensen remained a committed monarchist and sometimes appeared at official functions in his First World War uniform. He was suspected of disloyalty to the Third Reich, although nothing was proved against him at this time.

I’ve always found it a nice detail how he continued to show up in his old imperial Prussian officers uniform long after the empire had fallen. (Prussia was one of several states that unified and became Germany in the late 1800s. Before that there was no one country called Germany, it was Prussia, Bavaria, etc.)

Here he is at the funeral of Wilhelm II in 1941:

Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-L19106,_Doorn,_Beisetzung_Kaiser_Wilhelm_II.


Russian infantry take cover during their battle against the Austro-Hungarian army, at the beginning of World War I; ca. August 1914

5r4GEfq

 


German Field Bakery Near Ypres; ca. 1914

E4LEMcz


Image

“The Desolation of War” – Poelcapelle, Belgium; ca. 1917

qx14pTz


Image

German soldiers moving a 17cm medium minenwerfer into position in France; ca. 1917

AVcph79